Samantha NewberyInterrogation, Intelligence and Security: Controversial British Techniques

Manchester University Press, 2015

by Paul Knight on December 17, 2015

Samantha Newbery

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Interrogation, Intelligence and Security: Controversial British Techniques (Manchester University Press, 2015) by Samantha Newbery examines issues of history, efficacy, and policy in her thorough examination of British authorities' use of the "Five Techniques" in Aden, Northern Ireland, and Iraq. Dr. Newbery carefully scrutinizes the historical record, and offers a balanced perspective on controversial interrogation activities throughout the monograph. I look forward to reading her most recent publication, Why Spy?, co-authored with the late, highly decorated former British intelligence officer Brian Stewart.

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